Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Rachel Carson’

In the photo above, pitcher plants grow abundantly in Georgia's vast Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge. Canoes are the ideal vessel to explore the wonders of this natural treasure. The inset photo is a result of the curiosity of WRT member Paul Lamborn, DVM,  who wanted to see how many insects these carnivorous plants consume.

In the photo above, pitcher plants grow abundantly in Georgia’s vast Okefenokee Wildlife Refuge. Canoes are the ideal vessel to explore the wonders of this natural treasure. The inset photo is a result of the curiosity of WRT member Paul Lamborn, DVM, who wanted to see how many insects these carnivorous plants consume.

One of the most important books I’ve read in the past ten years was Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv. It has helped me clarify the overarching mission of Wildlife Research Team, for one thing, that what we’ve been doing since 1993 has been to reconnect people, especially children, with nature. His term, “nature deficit disorder” put a name to something I had detected among the kids who have volunteered with us. I’ve also learned of some very cool people in its pages, and I would consider them to be kindred spirits.

Mr. Louv also wrote of Harvard professor Howard Gardner’s groundbreaking discovery of multiple intelligences. The first time I had ever heard of this was when my daughter, Christianna, entered her new school’s new sixth grade gifted program. I recall thinking that this was a big step forward, understanding that not all children learn in the same way. There have been too many children who suffered under the belief that they were stupid because they could not grasp the standard curriculum. Many educators have since embraced Professor Gardner’s 1983 work. He argued that basing intelligence on I.Q. testing was far too restrictive. He even linked each intelligence to a different part of the brain; demonstrating that if that specific part of the brain was damaged by injury or disease, that the individual lost that type of intelligence.

Here are Gardner’s seven types of intelligence: linguistic intelligence (“word smart”); logical-mathematical intelligence (“number-reasoning smart”); spatial intelligence (“picture smart”); bodily-kinesthetic intelligence (“body smart”); musical intelligence (“music smart”); interpersonal intelligence (“people smart”); and intrapersonal intelligence (“self smart”). People can possess more than one type of intelligence, or even all of them! Think about it: understand which types of intelligence you possess, and you are much closer to choosing a satisfying and productive career. Don’t we all want to understand ourselves, others, and most importantly, our children, so that we can effectively guide them? Professor Gardner’s work has been a revolution. Curious about the seven intelligences? Google “Howard Gardner” and you will learn a great deal more.

It’s his Eighth Intelligence that has greater meaning to Louv, to environmental educators, and to me, because of Wildlife Research Team. In the late 1990s, Gardner added naturalist intelligence (“nature smart”) to the list: “The core of the naturalist intelligence is the human ability to recognize plants, animals, and other parts of the natural environment, like clouds or rocks…our ancestors needed to be able to recognize carnivorous animals, poisonous snakes, and flavorful mushrooms.” However, neurophysiology has not yet been able to pinpoint what part of the brain is associated to this eighth intelligence.

“Nature smart” people exhibit behaviors such as (but not limited to): caring about animals and plants; greater enjoyment of nature walks and camping than others; sharper sensory skills, to include noticing small things others don’t; can easily name, gather data about and categorize patterns, species and objects in the natural world; collect their findings in scrapbooks or logs, or make collections of specimens; and just like being outside in nature. Career choices include marine biologist, botanist, veterinarian, geologist, zookeeper, and many more. Please Google “eighth intelligence” and you will be richly rewarded!

Gardner declares Charles Darwin, John Muir, and Rachel Carson, as “nature smart” people; I must add WRT’s primary founder, Dr. Tom Kazo, to this esteemed list. Tom’s doctorates were in Ethology and Olfactory Mechanisms (he was a pioneer in drug-sniffing dogs). His mentor, Karl Lorenz was the preeminent name in ethology, which is much like, but not the same as, animal behaviorism. As Tom explained it to me, ethology is the study of how animals change their behavior in response to their changing environment. I’ve read different definitions since, but his makes the most sense to me. That was the underlying reason he named us Wildlife Research Team. I know he would have agreed with Gardner, that he possessed “nature smarts.” I guess you have to, if you can live alone for several weeks in the Amazon jungle.

I witnessed the great enjoyment Tom could get out of his observations of nature. For one thing, he was never bored. Isn’t that what we all desire, to never be bored, to enjoy every moment of our brief lives as they fly by? Tom’s secret: pay attention to nature. Not only is paying attention free; it will reward you in return. Time will become meaningless if you can learn to lose yourself in the actions of even the smallest creature.

When we take people out in our canoes, we often have to overcome the “Disneyfication” that they possess. Everyone wants to see a hippo! Everyone wants to race! Everyone want to get there NOW!

What makes you crazy? The little things, right? Coming at you too quickly? I am here to tell you, conversely, it’s the small gentle wonders that have the power to soothe and delight our frazzled souls and overcome that false sense of urgency. I think everyone can be “nature smart” with the right experiences. Since neurophysiology has yet to link a specific part of the brain to the eighth intelligence, perhaps it means our whole brain can become attuned to nature, for the good of all beings. What we know about, we care about.

When you paddle a canoe, you are usually traveling at about a walking pace. Life these days is all about going ever faster, but are humans really made for speed? How fast do you really need to fly through your life? What are you running from? Instead of fleeing to new countries, you might find happiness and peace in your very own neighborhood by developing your naturalistic intelligence. Develop awareness of the gifts nature has provided to you.

To me, this explains a lot: why canoeing can be both relaxing and energizing. A change in perspective always refreshes, don’t you agree? So come and enjoy WRT’s Canoe View, increase your eighth intelligence, slow down to Mother Nature’s authentic pace, and get more out of your life.

Tom wrote an article about a creature we almost always see from our Canoe View, the seemingly humble waterbug. This little guy, you will learn, is right up there with the Batmobile in abilities! This article was previously published in Tropical Trails magazine in the 1990s and has just been added to our Articles Page on our website.

“They are commonly called a whirligig, water bug, crazy beetle and a host of other colloquial names. Scientifically, they are Gyrinidae, in the order of Coleoptera. For normal folks, that’s the beetle family…”

Follow this link to read “Gyrinidae, The Ultimate Sports Bug.”

Thank you for being part of Wildlife Research Team!

Hope to see you in a black canoe,

Donna

Advertisements

Read Full Post »